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Source - P24.

In Turkey, MYMEDIA partner P24 is at the forefront of the fight for free media. Here is their reportage from the latest crack down on the media in Turkey.

Anti-terror police raids offices of the anti-government newsweekly Nokta, detains its managing editor. 

Anti-terror police teams raided the office of Nokta, a Turkish weekly news magazine, on Monday and detained its Managing Editor Murat Çapan on charges of “insulting the president,” and “supporting a terrorist organization.”

The raid came hours after a prosecutor ordered all of the copies of the magazine’s latest issue, which was to be distributed on Monday, collected.

The order was issued shortly after the magazine shared this week’s cover photo on its Twitter account on Sunday; showing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan taking a selfie in front of a coffin draped in a Turkish flag in the background

The cover photo was meant as a criticism of Erdoğan and his Justice and Development Party’s (AK Party) policies in the Turkish southeast, where violence between the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) and the Turkish military has recently escalated, Nokta editors have told P24.

The police raid on Nokta took place when P24 Legal Unit Lawyer Veysel Ok and P24 Projects Manager Evin Barış Altıntaş were vivsiting the Nokta office in Istanbul’s Okmeydanı district on Monday. P24 Legal Unit’s Ok, who will be assisting Nokta in its legal fight against Çapan’s detention as well as the decision to collect the latest issue of the daily, said there appeared to be a number of violations of freedom of expression and press laws.

Nokta Editor-in-Chief Cevheri Güven, who spoke to P24minutes before Çapan’s detention, said, “There are police officers outside. We feel that a detention is imminent.”

Güven also said that after the police collected the copies of Nokta on Sunday night, the printing house the magazine works with said they no longer wanted to print Nokta at their facilities.

Lawyer Ok said there have been a number of irregularities and violation of the free speech and press laws in place in how the magazine’s copies have been collected

A decision to collect all copies of a publication cannot be issued without a prior investigation into that publication, which is non-existent in Nokta’s case, Ok said. Furthermore, he noted that the order, issued at 1.30 am Monday morning, was null and void as the prosecutor issuing it was not formally on the list of designated on-duty prosecutors for after-work hours. “These are all violations of existing legislation,” Ok said.

Turkey ranks poorly on freedom of speech indices around the world. Its president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who has been criticized for his increasingly authoritarian rule, has recently cracked down on opposition media, following a fall in his AK Party’s votes on June 7. Scores of people have been charged with “insulting the president” over articles, writings, tweets or simply sharing social media posts.

Under Turkish law, the president has to be politically neutral. However, Erdoğan has openly supported the AK Party government in the latest general election.

The recent escalation of violence in the southeast comes after a two-year ceasefire with the Kurdish rebel group PKK ended last month.

 

 

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Source - P24.

In Turkey, MYMEDIA partner P24 is at the forefront of the fight for free media. Here is their reportage from the latest crack down on the media in Turkey.

Anti-terror police raids offices of the anti-government newsweekly Nokta, detains its managing editor. 

Anti-terror police teams raided the office of Nokta, a Turkish weekly news magazine, on Monday and detained its Managing Editor Murat Çapan on charges of “insulting the president,” and “supporting a terrorist organization.”

The raid came hours after a prosecutor ordered all of the copies of the magazine’s latest issue, which was to be distributed on Monday, collected.

The order was issued shortly after the magazine shared this week’s cover photo on its Twitter account on Sunday; showing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan taking a selfie in front of a coffin draped in a Turkish flag in the background

The cover photo was meant as a criticism of Erdoğan and his Justice and Development Party’s (AK Party) policies in the Turkish southeast, where violence between the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) and the Turkish military has recently escalated, Nokta editors have told P24.

The police raid on Nokta took place when P24 Legal Unit Lawyer Veysel Ok and P24 Projects Manager Evin Barış Altıntaş were vivsiting the Nokta office in Istanbul’s Okmeydanı district on Monday. P24 Legal Unit’s Ok, who will be assisting Nokta in its legal fight against Çapan’s detention as well as the decision to collect the latest issue of the daily, said there appeared to be a number of violations of freedom of expression and press laws.

Nokta Editor-in-Chief Cevheri Güven, who spoke to P24minutes before Çapan’s detention, said, “There are police officers outside. We feel that a detention is imminent.”

Güven also said that after the police collected the copies of Nokta on Sunday night, the printing house the magazine works with said they no longer wanted to print Nokta at their facilities.

Lawyer Ok said there have been a number of irregularities and violation of the free speech and press laws in place in how the magazine’s copies have been collected

A decision to collect all copies of a publication cannot be issued without a prior investigation into that publication, which is non-existent in Nokta’s case, Ok said. Furthermore, he noted that the order, issued at 1.30 am Monday morning, was null and void as the prosecutor issuing it was not formally on the list of designated on-duty prosecutors for after-work hours. “These are all violations of existing legislation,” Ok said.

Turkey ranks poorly on freedom of speech indices around the world. Its president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who has been criticized for his increasingly authoritarian rule, has recently cracked down on opposition media, following a fall in his AK Party’s votes on June 7. Scores of people have been charged with “insulting the president” over articles, writings, tweets or simply sharing social media posts.

Under Turkish law, the president has to be politically neutral. However, Erdoğan has openly supported the AK Party government in the latest general election.

The recent escalation of violence in the southeast comes after a two-year ceasefire with the Kurdish rebel group PKK ended last month.

 

 

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