Articles

Pensioner Raisa Eliseyeva was cleaning the bathroom when her flat was shaken three times by heavy shelling early on July 3.

When the 75-year-old woman opened the front door of her flat, she saw the ruined flats of her neighbors. So she sat down on the handrails and slid downstairs from the fourth to second floor, where some young men helped her to get out of the damaged building.
 
About a dozen of her fellow neighbors were killed that morning, when artillery shells from the Ukrainian military destroyed part of the apartment building located in Mykolayivka, a suburb of Sloviansk in Donetsk Oblast.
 
“I couldn’t believe I stayed alive,” Eliseyeva said, crying.  
 
Viktor and Emma Fonailov, an elderly couple, weren't so lucky when the shells came crashing into their private house. They were killed and some of their remains are still being sought for burial. Igor, Fonailov's son-in-law said "my wife survived just by happy chance."
 
The battle on July 3-4 was for control of the important crossroads suburb of Mykolayivka, where the Kharkiv-Rostov highway goes. That is how Sloviansk-based separatists were getting weapons, food and newcomers. 
 
But the liberation came at a terrible price. The fighting -- with civilians caught in the crossfire -- claimed dozens of lives in the small city of only 16,000 residents.
 
President Petro Poroshenko noted a “high level” of skill used in Mykolayivka by the armed forces, National Guard and special battalion Kyiv-1, the presidential press service reported on July 4. Some 50 insurgents, including their leader, a Russian citizen nicknamed Scorpio, were captured and 150 hostages liberated, the presidency added.
 
The authorities claim the separatists’ fighters were hiding in and firing from the people’s houses, which provoked shelling in return from the army.  
 
But the people who lost relatives or property are angry with the Ukrainian military forces for damaging their cities and with the current government authorities for not visiting them since the death and destruction.
 
“I won’t be able to love this country anymore,” Yeliseyeva said. After 30 years spent in Mykolayivka, she is planning to go back to Russian Siberia, where she was born.
 
Oleksiy Dmytrashkivsky, press officer of the general staff, said the locals attacked him and the Ukrainian TV crew when they came to the city several days after the fight. A unit of the National Guard, which settled in an abandoned orphanage, constructed barricades to protect themselves from civilians.  
 
Lera Zemlianska, pensioner, 63, survived only thanks to her decision to stay overnight at her daughter’s house, when her flat burned down in a fire started by the shelling. “I was told by phone that my house was burning, but I couldn’t come there as they were firing everywhere. So I ran to hide inside of the basement,” she said.
 
Most of the residents of Mykolayivka had to hide underground for two days to survive the shelling.
 
Viktor, who didn’t give his last name fearing the retribution from the authorities, said that many dead bodies were urgently buried in gardens as it was impossible to conduct a proper ceremony under fire and the smell of corpses was everywhere. Many residents are still missing. “I know at least seven people who are now looking for their relatives,” he said.
 
The locals say that dozens of dead bodies of Russian-backed militants, who were hiding on the hills around Mykolayivka, were still lying unburied. The shelling also destroyed a big power plant located in the city. There still no electricity, running water and phone connection there, so Eliseyeva was asking to report her daughter living in Canada the she was alive.
 
Poroshenko claimed protecting the civilians was the main aim of anti-terrorist operation. Vladislav Seleznev, spokesman of anti-terrorist operation, said the army was using a technique of “targeted shelling on terrorists” to avoid civilian casualties.
 
In Semenivka, a village of 380 people, one more strategic point around Sloviansk, there are no houses remaining undamaged after heavy fighting took place on July 5. There are numerous unexploded bombs stuck inside of the asphalt and no residents seen, except skinny cats and dogs searching for their owners who forgot about them, urgently escaping from war.
 
Andriy Myronov, 27, who worked at drinks plans located in Semenivka, stood shocked watching around at what used to be the village. “I feel a bitter aftermath after this war, not sure it’s over,” he said.
 
Driving by Soviet car, Oleksiy, who refused to give his last name, said that no more than scrap metal is left from his small sunflower factory.
 
Oleksiy created his business 14 years ago from scratch and invested about million hryvnias in what is now destroyed. He lived in center of Sloviansk but had to seek asylum in nearby Sviatohirsk as the rebels were often forcefully recruiting the city residents to fight with them. Now he is thinking how to rebuild his business and restore his house.  
 
“Maybe for someone the war is coming to the end, but for me it’s only the beginning,” he said.
 
A shell lies on the ground in Semyonovka
 
A damaged house in Semyonovka
 
Rescuers work amid the ruins of a house struck by a shell on July 3
 
Rescuers work amid the ruins of a house struck by a shell on July 3.
 
Local people watch as rescuers work in the ruins of a house.
 
Raisa Eliseeva, whose apartment was close to the explosion, tells the Kyiv Post how it happened.
 
Photographs, documents, necklaces and some other personal belongings of people whose house got destroyed by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
Editor’s Note: This article has been produced for Kyivpost with support from the project www.mymedia.org.ua, financially supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, and implemented by a joint venture between NIRAS and BBC Media Action.The content in this article may not necessarily reflect the views of the Danish government, NIRAS and BBC Action Media.
Републикация
Закрыть
Правила републикации материала
  • 1MYMEDIA welcomes the use, reprint and distribution of materials published on our site.
  • 2Mandatory conditions of using MYMEDIA materials are an indication of their authorship, pointing mymedia.org as the primary source and an active link to the original material on our site.
  • 3If only part of material is republished it must be mentioned in the text.
  • 4No changes of the content, names or facts, mentioned in material, are allowed as well as its other transformations that can cause distortion of the meaning and intent of the author.
  • 5MYMEDIA reserves the right at any time to revoke the permission to use our materials.

Pensioner Raisa Eliseyeva was cleaning the bathroom when her flat was shaken three times by heavy shelling early on July 3.

When the 75-year-old woman opened the front door of her flat, she saw the ruined flats of her neighbors. So she sat down on the handrails and slid downstairs from the fourth to second floor, where some young men helped her to get out of the damaged building.
 
About a dozen of her fellow neighbors were killed that morning, when artillery shells from the Ukrainian military destroyed part of the apartment building located in Mykolayivka, a suburb of Sloviansk in Donetsk Oblast.
 
“I couldn’t believe I stayed alive,” Eliseyeva said, crying.  
 
Viktor and Emma Fonailov, an elderly couple, weren't so lucky when the shells came crashing into their private house. They were killed and some of their remains are still being sought for burial. Igor, Fonailov's son-in-law said "my wife survived just by happy chance."
 
The battle on July 3-4 was for control of the important crossroads suburb of Mykolayivka, where the Kharkiv-Rostov highway goes. That is how Sloviansk-based separatists were getting weapons, food and newcomers. 
 
But the liberation came at a terrible price. The fighting -- with civilians caught in the crossfire -- claimed dozens of lives in the small city of only 16,000 residents.
 
President Petro Poroshenko noted a “high level” of skill used in Mykolayivka by the armed forces, National Guard and special battalion Kyiv-1, the presidential press service reported on July 4. Some 50 insurgents, including their leader, a Russian citizen nicknamed Scorpio, were captured and 150 hostages liberated, the presidency added.
 
The authorities claim the separatists’ fighters were hiding in and firing from the people’s houses, which provoked shelling in return from the army.  
 
But the people who lost relatives or property are angry with the Ukrainian military forces for damaging their cities and with the current government authorities for not visiting them since the death and destruction.
 
“I won’t be able to love this country anymore,” Yeliseyeva said. After 30 years spent in Mykolayivka, she is planning to go back to Russian Siberia, where she was born.
 
Oleksiy Dmytrashkivsky, press officer of the general staff, said the locals attacked him and the Ukrainian TV crew when they came to the city several days after the fight. A unit of the National Guard, which settled in an abandoned orphanage, constructed barricades to protect themselves from civilians.  
 
Lera Zemlianska, pensioner, 63, survived only thanks to her decision to stay overnight at her daughter’s house, when her flat burned down in a fire started by the shelling. “I was told by phone that my house was burning, but I couldn’t come there as they were firing everywhere. So I ran to hide inside of the basement,” she said.
 
Most of the residents of Mykolayivka had to hide underground for two days to survive the shelling.
 
Viktor, who didn’t give his last name fearing the retribution from the authorities, said that many dead bodies were urgently buried in gardens as it was impossible to conduct a proper ceremony under fire and the smell of corpses was everywhere. Many residents are still missing. “I know at least seven people who are now looking for their relatives,” he said.
 
The locals say that dozens of dead bodies of Russian-backed militants, who were hiding on the hills around Mykolayivka, were still lying unburied. The shelling also destroyed a big power plant located in the city. There still no electricity, running water and phone connection there, so Eliseyeva was asking to report her daughter living in Canada the she was alive.
 
Poroshenko claimed protecting the civilians was the main aim of anti-terrorist operation. Vladislav Seleznev, spokesman of anti-terrorist operation, said the army was using a technique of “targeted shelling on terrorists” to avoid civilian casualties.
 
In Semenivka, a village of 380 people, one more strategic point around Sloviansk, there are no houses remaining undamaged after heavy fighting took place on July 5. There are numerous unexploded bombs stuck inside of the asphalt and no residents seen, except skinny cats and dogs searching for their owners who forgot about them, urgently escaping from war.
 
Andriy Myronov, 27, who worked at drinks plans located in Semenivka, stood shocked watching around at what used to be the village. “I feel a bitter aftermath after this war, not sure it’s over,” he said.
 
Driving by Soviet car, Oleksiy, who refused to give his last name, said that no more than scrap metal is left from his small sunflower factory.
 
Oleksiy created his business 14 years ago from scratch and invested about million hryvnias in what is now destroyed. He lived in center of Sloviansk but had to seek asylum in nearby Sviatohirsk as the rebels were often forcefully recruiting the city residents to fight with them. Now he is thinking how to rebuild his business and restore his house.  
 
“Maybe for someone the war is coming to the end, but for me it’s only the beginning,” he said.
 
A shell lies on the ground in Semyonovka
 
A damaged house in Semyonovka
 
Rescuers work amid the ruins of a house struck by a shell on July 3
 
Rescuers work amid the ruins of a house struck by a shell on July 3.
 
Local people watch as rescuers work in the ruins of a house.
 
Raisa Eliseeva, whose apartment was close to the explosion, tells the Kyiv Post how it happened.
 
Photographs, documents, necklaces and some other personal belongings of people whose house got destroyed by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
A five-story house damaged by shelling
 
Editor’s Note: This article has been produced for Kyivpost with support from the project www.mymedia.org.ua, financially supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, and implemented by a joint venture between NIRAS and BBC Media Action.The content in this article may not necessarily reflect the views of the Danish government, NIRAS and BBC Action Media.
Копировать в буфер обмена
Подписаться на новости
Закрыть
Отписаться от новостей
Закрыть
Опрос
Закрыть
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3Как вы провели лето? *